Pillar 3

A Collaborative-Cooperative Community-base Housing Project

 By:

Dr. Tai Tuck Leong, Mr. CS Loh

 Affiliations:

Monsoon Malaysia

Policy Code:

3e Economic Justice

A) To create cheap, small-scale, cooperative, pleasant, comfortable and cheaply-affordable housing units with collaborative solutions to avoid the exploitative capitalism conditions impose on rakyat2 – such as rent, loans, mortages, debt, taxes, and insurance – by re-developing rehabilitated or abandoned housing projects towards Build It Now tiny homes by adopting (or exclusively stated-owned) the Industrial Building Systems and 3-D printing method and applying material science technologies to reduce costs besides improving the environmental sustainability of housing materials to allow living within an ecologically-friendly community.

To improve upon the following present approaches:

i) Rent-to-Own scheme without any capitalistic rental element;

ii) A national Youth-housing project with Rent-to-Own concept;

iii) Enhance upon, with more allocated fundings, to the Budget 2020 housing expenditure;

All fundings and national expenditure should be from the Petronas levy, PNB investment contributions and Government bonds (NOT from workers' EPF contributions).

B) To maintain an equitable and free accessibility healthcare polyclinic within each housing community for each and every community resident who is given free basic medicines.

C) To operate a free-shuttle service to a nearest MRT/LRT station where this transport unit is treble usage-mode to ferry school children, urban-working residents and housecarers.

A Comprehensive Action Plan for Mental Health and Psychosocial Support to Women

 By:

Roohaida Othman

 Affiliations:

IKRAM

Policy Code:

3i Health

1. Comprehensive plan of action to tackle this issue for women working from home during the pandemic and in post-pandemic phase.
2. Increase number of qualified counsellors under the ministry and state government.
3. Make the psychological and psychiatric treatments more accessible.
4. Include the topic of mental health in the school syllabus from primary school.

Abolish contract system for support service workers in public premises

 By:

Danial Hakeem

 Affiliations:

Jaringan Pekerja Kontrak Kerajaan

Policy Code:

3h Labour

The full absorption of support service workers in public premises as full time government employee. Direct employment will guarantee these workers rights and benefits as enjoyed by other employees who were already employed directly in these premises like doctors & teachers. In case of reforms, during the procurement process; such as banning subcontracting, regulating the appointment of procurement board members. Legal reforms; removing secrecy laws, include external party as monitors. Operational reforms; such as blacklisting contractors who violates workers rights, including special clause of cancellation taking bond money from contractors as security money for workers. And most importantly, workers right reforms, as stated in the employment act, and to be adequately protected during the pandemic with vaccination priority, proper PPE and frontliners' allowance.

Address the impact of COVID-19 on low-income women and children

 By:

Lim Su Lin

 Affiliations:

-

Policy Code:

3e Economic Justice

Malaysia’s social protection system needs to be critically re-evaluated to reduce the pandemic’s compound effects on pre-existing poverty, inequality and social exclusion, and to provide robust and comprehensive protection, especially for women and children coming from the urban poor and vulnerable communities.

Future social protection policies must specifically target these low-income women and girls, in all efforts to address the socioeconomic impact of COVID-19. To ensure this, a central coordinating committee should be set up, with representation from elected representatives, civil society and most importantly members from this community i.e. women and children themselves, to lend their perspective of lived experience. The committee should be tasked to establish key principles and priorities in assistance provision and delivery of immediate aid such as targeted cash transfers, food aid, healthcare. The committee should work with agencies and NGOS on the ground to deliver this.

To address mid-long term impacts, the committee should also look into reforming the current infrastructure of social assistance. Beyond receiving cash transfers and food aid, women and youth of working age would benefit greatly from support to increase their long-term economic resilience and independence. This could come in the form of providing greater access to work and business opportunities (including capital, space and equipment), as well as training, entrepreneurship and skills development programmes. As a first step, the committee should open up discussions with multiple stakeholders, involving government agencies such as SOCSO, Majlis Amanah Rakyat (MARA) and Human Resources Development Fund (HRDF) as well as NGOs and local leaders, to align efforts in developing and delivering these programmes to the community on the ground.

An Efficient Public Housing Policy

 By:

Wong Tsu Soon

 Affiliations:

Agora Society Malaysia

Policy Code:

3e Economic Justice

- Financial and power decentralisation of public housing to state governments and local authorities
- Transform unmarketable apartments/condominiums to publicly rentable units
- Subsidy and higher priority public housing rental approval for fresh graduates
- Public housing should be applicable to any income groups, preference based on working location
- The main consideration of approval should be the working location of applicants, to encourage short commuting and mixed income groups in an estate
- The rental should be set to not exceed market price, based on income bracket, and adjustable according to distance to working location, the nearer the cheaper
- The applicants with property should be considered in discretion of authorities based on working location as well, probably with higher rental

An independent, third-party Audit into the MOE’s finances

 By:

Fiqah Roslan

 Affiliations:

The Tiada.Guru Campaign

Policy Code:

3f Education

The services of an external auditing firm with a reputation of integrity, transparency, and effectiveness should be hired to audit the nearly ⅔ trillion ringgit that has been pumped into the Ministry of Education over the past 11 years.

It must be given full subpoena authority and access to all Ministry documents, up to the power of raids.

It must be given access to both police and MACC (or, in the future, Public Ombudsman) investigative units.

It must be primarily staffed with forensic accountants and Certified Fraud Examiners (CFE) with experience in education, Malaysia’s public service, computer forensics, and preparation for litigation (either civil or criminal).

The target areas should include economic damages (torts, breach of contract), contract fraud, money laundering and asset misappropriation, fabrication / falsifying of records, false suppliers, payroll fraud, data theft or misuse, reimbursement fraud, theft or misuse of services, assets, or privileges, procurement fraud, price fixing, secret tenders when open required, GST refund fraud, embezzlement / larceny, kickbacks, product substitution, shell company schemes, and/or other mechanisms to deceive the nation’s oversight agencies.

Appointment of the Office of the Attorney General and Director of Public Prosecution (DPP)

 By:

Jas/G25 Malaysia

 Affiliations:

G25 Malaysia

Policy Code:

3c Judiciary Reform

The AG and Director of Public Prosecution should be appointed with security of tenure; for example, their appointments could only be or made or terminated by His Majesty on the advice of an independent commission through a transparent, accountable and merit-based process; just like superior court judges.

B40 Corruption: Ameliorate Some Drivers of Corruption via Basic Income Strategies

 By:

john ku

 Affiliations:

-

Policy Code:

3d Anti corruption

Providing an income safety net for B40 households addresses a fundamental driver of corruption. While implementing such a system necessitates wide structural reform and political will, ensuring that all Malaysian citizens residing in the country have access to certain fundamental goods, including access to education, universal health care, and Basic Income in the form of social security or benefits will also bring about societal well-being and help create a peaceful, harmonious Malaysia with shared prosperity.
As in Norway, Basic Income provision by the government should be needs-based and tied to specific conditions to be met, such as requiring citizens to try and find a job, be law-abiding, participating in elections, and paying taxes.
The state can raise funds for the Basic Income plan via charging for goods and services which have so far been provided free, and via GST, which aids in democratising taxes, since it is based on consumption. [Note: GST system should include GST credits for B40 households]

Ban the appointment of Politician-Education Ministers

 By:

Fiqah Roslan

 Affiliations:

The Tiada.Guru Campaign

Policy Code:

3f Education

We must appoint, first by choice and then by law, Ministers of Education that are

1) Both a product of Malaysia’s education system and with at least five years of teaching experience at an MOE school. Borrowing from their children’s experience is simply not enough. Children, unfortunately, do not know 10% of the problems actually hidden inside a bilik guru. Often, well-connected families are placed in Band 1 or Band 2 schools that are exceptionally well-managed, but an ultra-minority. Example career positions that may satisfy the five-year minimum requirement include a former teacher, a former district / state / or national MOE officer, a long-term Teach for Malaysia alumnus. The easiest method is appointment as a Senator.

2) Enters the position with a deep understanding of the corruption, misconduct, lack of oversight, institutional rot, and failures of justice prevalent throughout Malaysia’s education system, from cities to schools. No more Education Ministers “learning on the job”, as our crises are far too acute. Their priorities must first center on removing investigative authority away from the Ministry of Education (KPM) and removing disciplinary authority away from the Education Services Commission (SPP). Both halves have failed our students: the KPM rarely investigates and the SPP almost never disciplines post-investigation. Both departments are the problem; fixing one alone is insufficient. Thus, we also suggest independent investigations *and* independent disciplinary proceedings, i.e., the Public Ombudsman.

3) Focused solely on education for all children within Malaysia’s borders, thus significantly free from racial, religious, and / or ethnic discrimination. Somewhat positive examples include Indonesia, though a work in progress with a dual-track system under the Ministry of Education and Ministry of Religion.

3) Hold no political party at the time of appointment (an Independent Senator) and most preferably has not held any party position in the last five years. Malaysia is full of competent, passionate, and serious educators that have been fighting for justice.

4) Willing to submit and agree to a new law that bans the appointment of future Politician-Education Ministers in future administrations.

Barriers to enrolment in national schools for non-citizen children of Malaysians

 By:

Bina Ramanand

 Affiliations:

Association of Family Support and Welfare Selangor and KL (Family Frontiers)

Policy Code:

3f Education

Education policies concerning non-citizen children with either parent Malaysia should be reviewed and reformed. This includes the following policy recommendations:
1. Amend provisions under the Education Act 1996 that limit public schools to citizens, and allow all children in Malaysia equal access to basic education regardless of citizenship status. This includes stateless and undocumented children.
a. Uphold the directive made by the Ministry of Education in 2018 under the ‘Zero Rejection Policy’ that allowed non-citizen and stateless children of Malaysian parents or guardians to register by requiring only relevant documents such as the child’s birth certificate, adoption papers or a court order.
b. Amend the directive by the Ministry of Education in 2018 to remove the two year limit on filing documentation or citizenship with the National Registration Department.
2. Extend services such as the Textbook Loan Scheme, Supplementary Food Programme and health programmes to all students regardless of citizenship status.
3. Establish and uphold a standard operating procedure for student enrolment in every school district across Malaysia.

Barriers to public healthcare at affordable rates for non-citizen children

 By:

Bina Ramanand

 Affiliations:

Association of Family Support and Welfare Selangor and KL (Family Frontiers)

Policy Code:

3i Health

Review and reform healthcare policies concerning children with either parent Malaysian to:
1. Allow all children (up to the age of 18) with either parent Malaysian to access public healthcare at the same rate as Malaysians, upon provision of the Malaysian parent’s IC. This includes children born overseas to Malaysians who may not hold a Malaysian Birth Certificate.
2. Ensure non-citizen children participating in the national school system are included in school-related health programs, including dental check-ups and other initiatives led by the Ministry of Health (MoH).
3. Grant vaccinations and immunisation programmes free-of-charge to non-citizen children and maternal care for their mothers.
Apart from the above recommendations concerning non-citizen children born to a Malaysian parent with valid documents, healthcare policies concerning undocumented or stateless, and adopted children should be reviewed and amended to allow:
1. Access to public healthcare services for undocumented or stateless children at the same rate as Malaysians.
2. All adopted children of a Malaysian parent to access public healthcare services at the same rate as Malaysians, upon provision of the parent(s) IC.

Build Holistic Society: Systemic & Institutional Corruption

 By:

May Leong, Janice Kwok, Aida Rahman, Hayley Lee, Ahmad Shafiee

 Affiliations:

-

Policy Code:

3d Anti corruption

Social norms, entrenched interests, and collective action problems make corruption highly resistant to reform. To achieve and sustain gains in corruption control, the existing corrupt equilibrium must be disrupted.
Commitment to Anti-Corruption
▪ Punish major offenders, including senior officials
▪ Guarantee free and independent media
▪ Allow civil society organizations and NGOs to access information and monitor / report on public services
▪ Ensure ACAs - anti-corruption agencies (e.g., MACC) can work independently
▪ Appoint politicians who publicly pledge to support anti-corruption and maintain public accountability for their actions
▪ Include anti-corruption education in all school curriculum
▪ Expand internet access for all Malaysians
▪ Strengthen Monitoring & Evaluation roles in all public services and ministries